[Infographic] Growth Hacking Process & High-Tempo Testing

Growth Hacking isn’t something you can learn overnight. Most people don’t even understand what it is. Today, I’m going to explain you everything you need to know about Growth Hacking. Growth Hacking isn’t really about hacking things.

Growth Hacking isn’t something you can learn overnight. Most people don’t even understand what it is. Today, I’m going to explain you everything you need to know about Growth Hacking.

Growth Hacking isn’t really about hacking things. It’s about experimenting various activities in order to drive growth.

Most people will start experimenting tomorrow and never start an experiment again. Unsustainable growth.

If you’re really into Growth Hacking, you need a process. One that will allow you to iterate quickly and drive growth.

That process has been described by many Marketers, however, most people find it hard to understand. Today, I’ve decided to boil it down to an infographic.

Here we are:

growth-hacking-infographic

To include this on your blog, just use the code below:

<a href=”http://www.pierrelechelle.com/growth-hacking-process”><img src=”http://www.pierrelechelle.com/files/2015/06/growth-hacking-infographic.png” /></a>

Conclusion

If there is one thing you should have learned today is that Growth Hacking is all about experimenting.

You’ll try plenty of things. Half won’t work. The interesting part is the other half. Keep doing these things and dump what didn’t work.

Be sure to capture your learnings as you go along the process. You don’t want to fail twice the same experiments.

By implementing this process, you’ll soon be able to grow incredibly fast and to generate more revenue (or whatever you’re after).

It’s up to you now: What were your most successful experiments? What have you learnt along the process?

Pierre Lechelle Headshot

I’m Pierre Lechelle and I’ve been working in the tech ecosystem building businesses for about 10 years. I’m now focused on helping MadKudu to reach $100M in ARR. Connect with me on LinkedIn.

Comments

  1. Great infographic and definitely all about testing.

    As you share some ideas will work, and others won’t. What do you feel is a “rule of thumb” for timing on letting an idea test? I know it’ll be different for each, but as a general rule any thoughts?

    • That’s a tough question. You can’t really have a “rule of thumb” since plenty of experiments may take more than an iteration to implement (e.g. Content Marketing will not yield results only if you post 1 blog post). However, we need to keep all these iterations the shortest possible as we want to experiment new things. I’d say that you may pursue an experiment for how long you feel is necessary. However, keep looking at results every week to ensure it’s not a fail / win already.

  2. Great concept. Helps a lot

    • Thank’s Hanif!

  3. Thanks for sharing! You lost me in the end so Im interested to learn what types of test (if not A/B tests) that you recommend that also generate valid numbers.

    • A/B Tests would be on your website, when you try to change different things in order to see if conversion increases. You could run tests / experiments on other parts of the Marketing funnel such as Traffic Acquisition or Content Marketing.

      You would do your experiment and see if the traffic from these sources converts better. As an example, you could launch AdWords campaigns and measure the Conversion Rate from each of the campaigns.

      Hope it helps!

  4. I’m a newbie at growth hacking. The concept isn’t widely used in where I come from (Thailand). This infographic sums it up pretty nicely. Thanks!

    • Glad it helps :)!

  5. I love the infographic. Good summary.

    Question: you said “you probably don’t need to spend weeks to do A/B testing”. What do you mean?

    Are you saying that you should create easy-to-run tests? Or “swing for the fences”, using tests that don’t take long to reach statistical significance? Or did you mean something else?

    • Thanks for the kind words Nathan.

      I meant that you should run easy-to-create tests. In 4 weeks, you’d be better off running 12 small tests (each of them creating small learnings), than 1 big test.

      The main mistake I see here is that people want to get things to perfection. They’d redo an entire website instead of trying plenty of smaller things. The bad side is that you’ll learn way less by redoing your entire website than by tweaking a few things.

      It’s a question of ICE-score in the end. What’s the impact / confidence / ease of each test? Hope it helps!

  6. Doing some solid stuff Pierre, keep up the good work!

    • Thanks for the kind words Trevor. I’m also a fan of your work @Inturact 🙂

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